Basement Talk 002: LGBT and the Biphobia in Cinema

In the second episode of Basement Talk hosted by Olivia Norwood and Anthony Peyton, we discuss the year so far in LGBT. This includes Netflix films like Alex Strangelove and blockbusters like Love, Simon. We also delve deep into the topic of biphobia within the film industry and the LGBT genre as well as what we think can be done about it.

Episode Length: 32 minutes

Intro & Outro Song: “Funhouse” by John Treash

 

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‘Remember Me’: 2010 Was Unnecessarily Depressing

By Anthony Peyton, Edited by Julia Wilson

In the daunting midst of the Twilight saga, Robert Pattinson stars as Tyler in Remember Me, the unnecessarily tragic story of a New Yorker in 2001.

It follows both him and a girl named Ally (Emilie de Ravin) as they develop a classic movie cliché relationship with plenty of issues and heartache. Half of this heartache is because of the detached relationship Tyler has with his father (played by Pierce Brosnan).

I chose this movie for this week’s Time Warp Tuesday because not only did I watch it yesterday, I also wanted to cover a Pattinson movie that wasn’t Twilight that had some impact. That impact being that not every movie has to be a tragedy to be good. Why I chose the one that has a 27% on Rotten Tomatoes, I couldn’t tell you.

The acting in this wasn’t anywhere near magical, but it was certainly cute. Sometimes what you need is a good cliché love story, no matter if the movie is outstanding or not.

That wasn’t all this movie was, though. It was a disastrous tragedy that didn’t need to happen. As hard as it is not to spoil the ending, I won’t. But all it proved was that some movies that have the ability to be good can stay good without having to be heartbreaking.

Remember Me is nowhere near a perfect movie. In fact, it’s not even considered a good movie by any aspect. Regardless, it taught everyone a lesson that’s made a movie after it. Thank God for that.

Top 10 Best Cult Classics

Top 10 Best Cult Classics

We all have those movies that we always go back to but then there’s those movies that everyone goes back to, creating a large following known as a ‘cult’ following.

  1. The Rocky Horror Picture Show

Time Warp me back to the release of this movie because I can’t imagine how audiences reacted when Tim Curry came out in full drag. This musical is so good that people are performing weekly midnight showings of it in their local indie theatres.

2. Clueless

Ugh! As if we wouldn’t include the funny Cher Horrowitz and the movie that made yellow plaid a fashion statement. Clueless is amongst some of the many movies that involve girl groups, ruling the school, and quotable characters. We love this movie because it never goes out of style.

3. Mean Girls

Considered one of the best movies of all time (we may be bias), Tina Fey ingrained Mean Girls into our culture and society with iconic quotes and a clever story that even managed to become its own Broadway musical.

4. The Room

The man, the myth, the legend Tommy Wisseau wrote, directed, and starred in this cult classic. Although it didn’t start out as a hit, now there are midnight showings all over of the best worst movie of all time.

5. Jaws

Wow, scary! Big fish! Bad special effects! But people enjoy this films many attractions across the world. Now, everyone has a fear of sharks. Thanks Jaws!

6. Shaun of the Dead

With the name playing off of the horror film Dawn of the Dead, it’s basically a given that Shaun of the Dead would be the gory comedy we know it to be.

7. Fight Club

Including one of the biggest plot twists in cinema history, Fight Club continues to be a favorite for film geeks everywhere.

8. Labyrinth

David Bowie in a world of magical creatures where he rules as Jareth the Goblin King? Yes, please!

9. Heathers

Let’s be honest, Heathers was the beginning of the popular mean girl trope that we’ve seen repeated since the day it was released.

10. Pulp Fiction

We now put an end to this list with one of Quentin Tarantino’s best movies. Pulp Fiction not only makes us laugh but it’s filled with a star-studded cast that work like magic together. Along with great music and a memorable dance scene between John Travolta and Uma Thurman, Tarantino really outdid himself with this one.

Performances of the Year: A ‘Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far On Foot’ Review

By Olivia Norwood, Edited by Julia Wilson

Joaquin Phoenix has been surprising us with performances at every corner this year…and really long movie titles. First with the darker thriller You Were Never Really Here earlier this year, and now the more lighthearted dramedy Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far On Foot.

Based on an actual story, Phoenix portrays handicapped artist John Callahan as he recounts his trials of pulling himself out of alcoholism and into sobriety. Along the way, he meets his sponsor Donny (Jonah Hill), falls in love with his nurse Annu (Rooney Mara), and discovers his missing birth mother Maggie (Mirielle Enos).

Although inspiring, the story isn’t the only strong aspect of the film. The acting and character development is unique and powerful as Phoenix shows the humility of John, and Hill transforms Donny’s character from pretentious to having actual depth. I know I said it earlier on this year, but I believe one of the two movies that Phoenix has starred in will give him an Oscar nomination, as well as Hill receiving a nomination alongside him.

Hill has been nominated in the past for The Wolf of a Wall Street and Moneyball but neither of those showed his true range. Yes, he was funny in this film but by the end of the film you got to see past the character’s obvious facade which revealed his inner struggles. A struggle that resulted in a deeply emotional scene between Donny and John that I won’t spoil because it’s so good!

Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far On Foot is filled with strong performances not only from its main actors, but also its compelling ensemble. It is heartwarming and heartbreaking without being complicated and cheesy about achieving either.


My Rating: 93%

Acting: 3.9/4

Cinematography: 3.7/4

Story: 3.8/4

Enjoyability: 3.6/4

‘BlacKkKlansman’ Is The Wake Up Call We Need

By Julia Wilson, Edited by Anthony Peyton

BlacKkKlansman tells the true story of Ron Stallworth (John David Washington), the first African American to serve in the Colorado Springs Police Department. Shortly after joining the department, Stallworth decides to go undercover and infiltrate the Ku Klux Klan.

While Stallworth connects with the KKK members over the phone, white police officer Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver) interacts with them in person. Together they are able to gather valuable intel on the KKK and anticipate some of their attacks.

This movie does an excellent job at showing the ugly truth of the hate that is just as present in America today as it was in the early 70’s when this story took place. It makes you uncomfortable and angry, especially with all its reminders that this kind of hate is still heavily prevalent today.

The film definitely does not shy away from its fair share of references to Trump. One such reference is when the Grand Wizard of the KKK, David Duke (Topher Grace), says to Stallworth that we need someone in office who will help America achieve greatness again.

Being produced by the same team that made Get Out, I had high expectations for this film and I was not disappointed. Everything about it was superb and aided its message.

I was especially impressed by the acting in this film. These were all very heavy roles to play considering not only the fact that it was based on a true story, but also that the story surrounds such sensitive subject matter. But every single person in this film was brilliant, and you know they were doing a good job based on the fact that the film was so hard to watch at times.

Overall, BlacKkKlansman forces you to see the hate and racism that lies within America. It even ends by showing clips of the violent protests that took place in Charlottesville, VA exactly one year ago, killing 3 people and injuring many others. It also shows clips of Trump, and clips of the real David Duke still doing hateful talks to this day. These serve to remind us that even though the story the film tells took place in the early 70’s, it is just as relevant today as it was then.


My Rating: 91%

Acting: 3.7/4

Cinematography: 3.6/4

Story: 3.8/4

Enjoyability: 3.5/4

Film Forecast Friday: August 10th

On Friday August 10th we have…

1. The Meg

2. Black KkKlansman

3. Slender Man

4. Dog Days

Julia’s Prediction:

There aren’t any crazy big releases this week so it’s hard to say what will have the biggest impact on the box office.

The Meg seems kinda dumb and I’m not really sure how much people care about shark movies anymore, so it wouldn’t surprise me if it flopped. It does have some decently big names in it such as Rainn Wilson (The Office) and Ruby Rose (Orange Is The New Black) so maybe that could save it.

Black KkKlansman is arguably the best quality movie hitting theaters this weekend and after the rave reviews it’s been getting from critics I think it will do fairly well at the box office.

As for Slender Man, I think it might do okay considering the infamy of the legend behind it and the fact that there aren’t really any other horror films out to compete with it right now, as it is August, but not really expecting too much.

And Dog Days will probably do alright as a family film even though no one really asked for Valentine’s Day but with dogs.

Anthony’s Prediction:

I’m beyond interested in what this week is gonna bring. Specifically how awful The Meg is. It is absolutely garbage. Unfortunately, it will also do the best in the box office this weekend.

Next we have the much more interesting Slender Man which was severely under marketed. I am just curious what the future of 2018 will bring and especially what horrible horror movies are in the works.

Dog Days will also do well at the box office. It has an all star cast and DOGS. Who doesn’t love DOGS!

Last but not least we have BlackKkKlansman which actually looks pretty decent.

‘The Spy Who Dumped Me’ Was Funnier than I Expected

By Olivia Norwood, Edited by Therese Gardner

If you’ve ever seen any Austin Powers film, then you would know that the spy genre and comedy works in the most magical of ways. But what we hardly ever see from this hybrid is a female duo. In the new film, The Spy Who Dumped Me, we get to see a funny and clumsy pair that seem to find danger everywhere they turn.

The film opens on Mila Kunis’ stuck-in-a-rut character Audrey celebrating a depressing birthday amidst a breakup with her boyfriend. Her best friend Morgan (Kate McKinnon) tries her very best to cheer up the friend who was dumped over text with a random, over the top song (being extra is what McKinnon does best). But while this is happening, we switch over to a foreign country to find that her now ex-boyfriend Drew (Justin Theroux) is being chased by random men, jumping between buildings, and then blowing them up. This is when we know that he is clearly a spy… and also a shitty boyfriend who breaks up over text.

As Audrey lives her now single life, she is confronted by CIA agents and they reveal to her that her ex-boyfriend is, indeed, a spy. Shaken by this, she goes to tell Morgan in which Drew surprisingly appears outside of her window. She confronts him about his double life and suddenly a shootout happens. He tells her to bring a package (a 2nd place Fantasy Football trophy) to a cafe in Vienna and that is where our spy adventure begins.

I won’t spoil the rest but I have to say that I didn’t expect the amount of death and gore that this film ended up having. Not a bad thing but definitely unexpected.

To be quite frank, I wasn’t falling for the film’s humor in the first 15 minutes but as it progressed I found it to be absolutely hilarious and further proves that McKinnon wasn’t the only comedian. Kunis has been delivering comedy since her career began on That 70’s Show and continued on with Family Guy, Friends with Benefits, Ted, and more recently Bad Moms. She obviously has a funny bone and a knack for making people laugh until it hurts but she never really gets the credit she deserves. It seemed like The Spy Who Dumped Me was mostly written to give McKinnon all of the comedic lines as she portrays the ‘funny friend’ but Kunis never lacks on her job to serve a punch of wit and humor.

All in all, The Spy Who Dumped Me had a fun action-packed plot and never failed to make me laugh, but it also gave me a reason to not discredit McKinnon for doing one bad movie (Rough Night).


My Rating: 78%

Acting: 3/4

Cinematography: 2.9/4

Story: 3.2/4

Enjoyability: 3.5/4