Wiping Away Tears: ‘Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero’

By Anthony Peyton, Edited by Julia Wilson

Movies that involve dogs are quickly becoming everyone’s weakness, and animated dogs seem to be making just the same impact.

In the true story Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero, we follow Bull Terrier (or Boston Terrier, it’s been of debate) Stubby and Private J. Robert Conroy (Logan Lerman) as they build a strange but very beautiful friendship in the light of World War I.

To be entirely honest, I’ve been seeing this trailer for months now and I had absolutely no interest in watching it. I thought it was going to just feel like every other animated family movie with very little depth like The Nut-Job. I was mistaken.

I was taken on a journey with joy, fear, and quite a few sad – and happy – tears.

The animation itself was fairly good. It wasn’t the craziest, but it wasn’t the worst. Not every movie can be The Incredibles or Finding Nemo. However, the animation team did everything they could have done by paying attention to detail and creating a war setting that felt all too real. For example, at the beginning of the movie when Stubby was a stray searching the city for food, they show his hunger by very carefully revealing the ribs protruding from his sides.

Throughout the whole movie, Stubby proves himself to be the cutest – and bravest – puppy that has ever joined the U.S. military ranks. In fact, Stubby was even promoted to sergeant during WWI and quickly became the most decorated dog in history before his death after the war in 1926. Luckily for me and my fragile heart, the movie ended just after the war and doesn’t take you all the way to his death.

This film really brought to light a smaller story in the much bigger history of WWI that not many people are aware of. Through its cinematography and story, we see the intensity of the bombs, the mustard gas, and the treachery of the trenches that WWI became known for. We see how one little dog named Stubby saved hundreds of lives.

Sergeant_Stubby_2-thumbs


My Rating: 92%

Animation: 3.5/4

Cinematography: 3.6/4

Story: 3.8/4

Enjoyability: 3.8/4

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