‘Something in the Air’ and its Exposure of Teenage Fantasies

By Olivia Norwood, Edited by Julia Wilson

Let’s do something different and review a movie from a few years ago because sometimes we miss the chance to speak our opinions on a film that should be talked about. Today, we’re talking about the 2012 French drama, Something in the Air.

Set in 1970’s France, the young artist Gilles (Clément Métayer) gets involved in a radical political group that believes they are the start of a small revolution with the usual hippie and drug combination that would almost be offensive if they hadn’t put it in.

Writer and Director Olivier Assayas (Personal Shopper) portrays himself in the character of Gilles as he struggles with whether or not he should make films, be a painter, or be an activist. But he finds himself “joining the cause” to avoid alienation from his political friends who choose to make posters and graffiti buildings over doing something that matters. Gilles decides to take the creative route and eventually leaves his chaotic and radical friends behind to pursue a dream.

What I’m taking away from this is to follow your heart not the herd. Teenagers, like the ones in the film, are impressionable and often pressured into what their friends do because they don’t want to miss out on their youth before life happens. And when it finds you, you can’t run away from it. Eventually, you have to grow up which is what Gilles finds himself facing and ultimately realizes that life on the other side isn’t so bad.

Being a revolutionary seems exciting in the moment, but all revolutions come to an end and that’s kind of like youth.

Something in the Air is a film that, in the beginning, makes you want to travel the world without a worry or responsibility. By the end, you realize that it isn’t real. It’s a facade of happiness.


My Rating: 69%

Acting: 2.3/4

Cinematography: 3/4

Story: 3/4

Enjoyability: 2.7/4

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