‘Disobedience’: Religion and Sexual Repression

By Olivia Norwood, Edited by Julia Wilson

LGBT storylines in film have become increasingly popular due to its Academy Award winning predecessors Moonlight and Call Me By Your Name and the new drama Disobedience follows in their path.

Set in an Orthodox Jewish community, New York photographer Ronit (Rachel Weisz) goes back home for her Rabbi father’s funeral but finds herself rekindling with her old flame, Esti (Rachel McAdams) – who is also married to their Rabbi childhood friend, David (Alessandro Nivola).

Living in a one-sided relationship is hard enough as it is but when you add the complexity of hiding one’s sexuality. Ronit has the freedom of living however she feels while Esti is trapped in an unaccepting community where everyone knows what goes on behind closed doors.

This relationship was different than the others. Where Call Me By Your Name is more erotic and lustful, Disobedience is sentimental and heartbreaking.

These two women have been in love since their youth but their environment continuously tears them apart and manipulates the way they live. And the way it affected the husband and/or third party is much more meaningful and real.

Along with acting being its strongest quality, the story was just as powerful and special.

Disobedience gave a quintessential look at human feelings, not desires. It’s simple and refined while dealing with the complexities of love and living in a benighted world.


My Rating: 80%

Acting: 3.8/4

Cinematography: 3/4

Story: 3/4

Enjoyability: 3/4

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