How to Be a Boss and Other Lessons We Learned from ‘The Devil Wears Prada’

By Olivia Norwood, Edited by Julia Wilson

Anna Wintour. Vogue. New York. High Fashion. This is the groundwork and inspiration for the 2006 hit The Devil Wears Prada.

The legendary Meryl Streep portrays Miranda Priestly, the frigid editor-in-chief of a fictional fashion magazine in New York. Sound familiar? Well, what isn’t familiar to us audiences and fashion lovers (although we wish it were) is the story of Andy (Anne Hathaway) and her grueling yet, eye-opening experience as Priestly’s personal assistant.

While many think that working in fashion is a heaven that includes free Louboutins, this film shows the realistic day to day life and its cutthroat mentality. Andy finds herself to be the black sheep at her work as she refuses to fit in with the fashionable, size 2 women around her. But she quickly realizes that in order to earn respect she must act and look the part.

It may be hard for the chick-flick shamers to admit or understand but this film has a deeper meaning than just “fashion week” and “designer bags” (even though I wouldn’t mind a movie about the history of The Birkin). The deeper meaning I’m talking about is simple: being at the top doesn’t always make you happy.

Andy was a journalism student who’d rather write about current affairs than current trends. But in order to get quick success, she chose the job that wasn’t a part of her own dream and even though she was in a higher paying job working with one of the most important people in fashion, she wasn’t happy. She also lost sight of who she was and distanced herself from the people who mattered.

But, there’s a bright side and another important lesson to be learned. While being a personal assistant, Andy became more confident, more articulate, and more knowledgeable on the industry. Miranda Priestly might’ve been stone-cold but she did her job and steamrolled through when it became stressful. She was powerful, intelligent, and no one could touch her. If that isn’t the definition of a boss woman then I don’t know what is.

The Devil Wears Prada taught us what it means to become a better, headstrong version of you while always staying true to yourself.

Advertisements

‘Ocean’s 8’: The Queens of Heist

By Anthony Peyton, Edited by Julia Wilson

We all have come to love the Ocean’s movies. There’s also a lot of them. We’ve had Ocean’s Eleven (2001), Ocean’s Twelve (2004), Ocean’s Thirteen (2007), and now we have Ocean’s 8. What’s unique about this one, however, is that it’s all women.

Very powerful women.

The premise is very similar to that of its previous counterparts. This time, it’s about eight women who are absolutely determined to pull off one of the greatest heists in history. Let’s quickly discuss who plays the beautiful characters in this movie.

First off, we have the brilliant Sandra Bullock (The Blind Side), who is as good as ever as the leader of the clan. Next we have Cate Blanchett (Thor: Ragnarok) as Bullock’s equally gorgeous partner-in-crime. Among them, there is Anne Hathaway (Brokeback Mountain, The Devil Wears Prada), Rihanna, Awkwafina (Dude, Crazy Rich Asians), Helena Bonham Carter (Sweeney Todd, Alice in Wonderland), Mindy Kaling (The Mindy Project, The Office), and Sarah Paulson (American Horror Story).

As much as I love each of these ladies’ performance, I definitely have some favorites. Bullock knew just how powerful she could be and acted on that. I may be biased, but Carter did phenomenal in the few scenes she was in. She’s always been my favorite actress and this only furthered that thought. Seeing Hathaway and Rihanna play such personality defying performances brought as much shock value to me as anything in this film. Obviously I love this movie.

The story was fun. It wasn’t the most unique or intricate, but it was definitely very enjoyable to sit back and relax to. Nothing brought much anxiety to the watcher, but it didn’t need it either.

Ultimately, Ocean’s 8 wasn’t an Oscar worthy movie, but I would definitely see it again just to watch some of my favorite people act in a movie together so well.


My Rating: 86%

Acting: 3.7/4

Cinematography: 3.3/4

Story: 3/4

Enjoyability: 3.8/4