100th Day of BFS: The Best and Worst of 2018

To celebrate the 100th day of Basement Film Society, we’ve decided to take (nearly) every single movie that’s come out this year and put them in a list of top 10 and bottom 10.

The lists are based on the ratings that they have been given in our reviews. Percentages will be included in this post, as well. 

Anyways, let’s get started and thank you so much for joining us in our 100 day celebration! We cannot wait for 100 more!

Top 10 Best Movies… so far.

  1. First Reformed (98%)
  2. Hereditary (98%)
  3. Won’t You Be My Neighbor (96%)
  4. You Were Never Really Here (96%)
  5. Tully (96%)
  6. Adrift (95%)
  7. American Animals (94%) 
  8. Game Night (93.7%)
  9. Incredibles 2 (93%)
  10. Veronica (93%)

Top 10 Worst Movies… so far.

  1. 7 Days in Entebbe (56%)
  2. Overboard (53%)
  3. Red Sparrow (50%)
  4. Super Troopers 2 (46%)
  5. Taco Shop (39.4%)
  6. Truth or Dare (36%)
  7. Step Sisters (35%)
  8. Tyler Perry’s Acrimony (33%)
  9. The Week Of (19%)
  10. The Kissing Booth (18%)

 

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‘Boundaries’ Beautifully Depicts the Ups and Downs of Family

By Julia Wilson, Edited by Anthony Peyton

Finally, a road trip movie worth watching.

For some reason road trips are often used in movies for both comedic and dramatic uses, and in most movies that feature them that is all they are about. But Boundaries is about so much more than that. It shows the sacrifices that we make for our family, despite the emotional turmoil that they may cause us.

Boundaries tells the story of Laura (Vera Farmiga), a single mother who rescues every stray animal she sees, and her troublesome relationship with her father Jack (Christopher Plummer). After avoiding her father for quite some time, Laura ends up having to drive him from Seattle to LA so he can stay with her sister Jojo (Kristen Schaal) after he is kicked out of his nursing home.

On this road trip they are accompanied by Laura’s son Henry (Lewis MacDougall), a socially awkward teenage boy, and some of the many dogs Laura has rescued. Unknown to Laura, Jack also has brought along large amounts of marijuana that he has enlisted Henry’s help with selling throughout their journey.

Boundaries is different than most road trip movies because it has so many different layers with some intricate character development. There is a lot going on with each and every character that intertwines itself with the story, making you very invested in all of them.

There is Laura and her relentless love for everyone around her, even when it hurts her. Henry with his issues at school and being able to interact with other people. And finally Jack, who has never been there for his children and is trying to figure out how to change his ways.

This really is a character driven piece which is why it was aided so heavily by the fact that the actors were brilliant. They were each able to portray the complexities of their characters in a way that brought you into the story so effortlessly.

This film was also quite funny. Although the story it presented was more dramatic in its nature, the dialogue and the interactions between the characters gave it a very cleverly thought out humor.

To be honest, I liked this film a lot more than I thought I would. I am always skeptical of road trip movies because they are usually all the same, but I was very pleasantly surprised by this one.

Boundaries tells an intricate and entertaining story of family and the complex emotions that go with it. Between the enthralling story mixed with both drama and comedy and the brilliant acting, I would highly recommend this film.


My Rating: 89%

Acting: 3.7/4

Cinematography: 3.4/4

Story: 3.7/4

Enjoyability: 3.5/4

 

Mr. Rogers Recaptures Our Hearts in ‘Won’t You Be My Neighbor?’

By Olivia Norwood, Edited by Therese Gardner

Children’s television has become something of a mass produced ploy to sell products to its very young audiences. They don’t really convey a message. But, children’s television used to be something more. In the new heartfelt documentary, Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, we discover the impact of one television program and it’s unlikely star.

If you know the tune, then you know the show. Won’t You Be My Neighbor? is about the Dalai Lama of television, Fred Rogers, and his educational show Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood.

Many know that Rogers was a good man as he was an ordained minister, worked closely with professionals to understand child psychology, and convinced Senator Pastore to continue funding for public television. But, what many do not know is that he cared deeply and fondly about the children who viewed his show and the world they were growing up in.

He loved children which is shown through clips of interviews where he describes how his passion for spreading kindness became his life long mission. He made sure that children knew how special they were and that they were loved.

In the film, audiences not only find out the story of Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood but, also who Mr. Rogers was. We quickly learn that the soft spoken and happy man dealt with his own internal struggles and dealt with them through music and a little stuffed tiger named, Daniel.

He was constantly criticized for being open-minded and kind. It seemed impossible for someone like Rogers to exist but, he proved that being compassionate isn’t always hard to do. He was understanding of others feelings and not only listened but cared what people had to say. Which is what made the show so successful in touching the hearts of so many.

Won’t You Be My Neighbor? is just as beautiful as the soul of its subject and will bring people to tears just listening to the beloved Mr. Rogers sing the tune that used to brighten our days and capture our hearts.


My Rating: 97%

Directing: 3.8/4

Cinematography: 3.8/4

Story: 4/4

Enjoyability: 4/4