‘Shrek’ Me Up: A Look Back on the Childrens’ Classic

By Anthony Peyton, Edited by Julia Wilson

For this Time Warp, I decided I would touch on one of my absolute favorite animated movie franchises. That, of course, is the Academy Award winning film, ‘Shrek’. It’s still funny to me to be able to say “Academy Award winning” to the classic swamp-dwelling ogre that is my man Shrek.

Many who haven’t seen this iconic film may ask why it won Best Animated Feature in 2002. Well, those who have seen it can tell you exactly why.

The mean green fighting machine Shrek (Mike Myers) is an angry ogre who just likes to be left alone, as most people nowadays. But once love comes along, that changes, as with anyone who suddenly finds love. Shrek’s love didn’t come suddenly, of course. It came after a long journey with his new friend – whether or not he likes to admit it – a donkey, whose name is, well, Donkey (Eddie Murphy).

The love interest/self-hating princess in the movie is Fiona (played by Cameron Diaz), who loves throwing tantrums at every moment she can. You may think that it’s obnoxious, but it becomes very easy to love her by the end.

That is the overall plot of the entire first movie, but they do so well developing all the relationships within it. Being able to meet dozens of fairy tale creatures who annoy Shrek to the brink of absolute fury is, even if it’s not to Shrek, completely hilarious to watch.

Half the enjoyability of this movie revolves around the supreme soundtrack that plays throughout. I mean, we have songs like “All Star” by Smash Mouth and “Bad Reputation” performed by Joan Jett. That sells it right there, doesn’t it?

It’s an undeniably enjoyable movie and impossible not to love. It sparked a sequel that is debatably better than the first if not just as good. It’s one of those movie franchises that anybody will want to watch on a lazy afternoon in the summer, with their kids for a family movie night, in the middle of a snowstorm in the winter, or pretty much at anytime. That is how I define a classic.

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Film Forecast Friday: June 1st

On Friday June 1st we have…

1. Adrift

2. Upgrade

3. Action Point

4. American Animals

5. A Kid Like Jake

Julia’s Predictions:

This is an interesting week because for the first time in a while there are no big blockbusters being released. Out of the movies that are being released I think Adrift will have the biggest box office numbers. It has notable actors Shailene Woodley (Fault in Our Stars, Divergent) and Sam Claflin (Me Before You, Hunger Games) in it and I’ve seen a lot of marketing for it.

I think Action Point and Upgrade will do alright. I haven’t heard too much about either of them, but Action Point has Johnny Knoxville (Jackass) in it which will likely bring out audiences. Also, Upgrade is a Blumhouse Productions film and those tend to do well.

American Animals is absolutely amazing and I strongly recommend you go see it. We have already reviewed it, so if you need any more convincing to go see it check out our review!

Finally, A Kid Like Jake which honestly I didn’t know was a movie until today. It has Jim Parsons in it so maybe it will attract some Big Bang Theory fans?

Anthony’s Predictions:

I am beyond excited for Adrift with Shailene Woodley and Sam Claflin. This will also be the moneymaker for the week at the box office, even if it will not make quite as much as previous weeks.

I have heard so much about American Animals that I’ve gotten very excited to see it. It has such a unique group of actors in it (including Evan Peters!) so I know that I’ll enjoy it already.

I definitely forgot Action Point and Upgrade were even coming out this week. I don’t really have a high opinion on them but I believe they will do about the same at the box office.

A Kid Like Jake won’t be too crazy spectacular, but should be fun because of Big Bang Theory’s Jim Parsons, as he is in it.

‘Something in the Air’ and its Exposure of Teenage Fantasies

By Olivia Norwood, Edited by Julia Wilson

Let’s do something different and review a movie from a few years ago because sometimes we miss the chance to speak our opinions on a film that should be talked about. Today, we’re talking about the 2012 French drama, Something in the Air.

Set in 1970’s France, the young artist Gilles (Clément Métayer) gets involved in a radical political group that believes they are the start of a small revolution with the usual hippie and drug combination that would almost be offensive if they hadn’t put it in.

Writer and Director Olivier Assayas (Personal Shopper) portrays himself in the character of Gilles as he struggles with whether or not he should make films, be a painter, or be an activist. But he finds himself “joining the cause” to avoid alienation from his political friends who choose to make posters and graffiti buildings over doing something that matters. Gilles decides to take the creative route and eventually leaves his chaotic and radical friends behind to pursue a dream.

What I’m taking away from this is to follow your heart not the herd. Teenagers, like the ones in the film, are impressionable and often pressured into what their friends do because they don’t want to miss out on their youth before life happens. And when it finds you, you can’t run away from it. Eventually, you have to grow up which is what Gilles finds himself facing and ultimately realizes that life on the other side isn’t so bad.

Being a revolutionary seems exciting in the moment, but all revolutions come to an end and that’s kind of like youth.

Something in the Air is a film that, in the beginning, makes you want to travel the world without a worry or responsibility. By the end, you realize that it isn’t real. It’s a facade of happiness.


My Rating: 69%

Acting: 2.3/4

Cinematography: 3/4

Story: 3/4

Enjoyability: 2.7/4

‘Ready Player One’: Throwbacks, Action, (Slightly Mediocre) Acting, Oh My!

By Anthony Peyton, Edited by Olivia Norwood

Welcome to the significantly more intense and highly anticipated Wreck-it Ralph/Tron remix that is Ready Player One. A movie that can only be described by asking you to picture the Iron Giant – yes, the one from the 1999 movie – in an all out war against Godzilla.

Can you picture it? Good.

In Steven Spielberg’s newest movie based off of the highly acclaimed novel by Ernest Cline, we get to live in the world of Wade Watts (Tye Sheridan) as he navigates through a crazy complicated Easter egg hunt – which somehow managed to involve King Kong jumping off a building attempting to destroy a DeLorean complete with a flux capacitor – that only took half of the movie to explain.

This was an Easter egg hunt for half a trillion dollars and the sole proprietorship of a video game world called the “Oasis”, given that it’s the only sane place for the majority of people in a post factory apocalypse world. It was created by a slightly senile man by the name of James Halliday (Mark Rylance) who does a good job of showing up at very odd but convenient times throughout the movie.

Sheridan stars alongside Olivia Cooke (Thoroughbreds), who plays Samantha Cook, a slightly self conscious in real life but confident in the Oasis girl, whom is also aiming to win the hunt.

As the first thirty-ish minutes of the movie comes and goes, it becomes pretty obvious that this is no one’s best performance. Cooke is unbearably monotone during certain points in the movie where a little emotion would’ve furthered the character. Sheridan’s performance equals that of X-Men, which may or may not be a good thing.

Take it as you will.

On top of the slightly mediocre acting, the camera angles and special effects towards the beginning of the film can be nauseating and rather jam-packed with the many references you want to scream at (it actually zooms in on Minecraft World before the camera does a 360 degree flip into a space fight). Fortunately, this didn’t manage to bring down the style of the production design and clearly thought out cinematography that was put into the film as a whole.

Aside from these aspects, the actual plot left something to be desired. As aforementioned, the description of the Easter egg hunt by James Halliday was very complex and took half of the movie to fully explain, although it did have a very interesting opening scene that described the  bare minimum of rules – or the lack of them – in the game.

The subplot of Ready Player One actually did better than most movies usually do. This one was very much the classic cliche love story, but it directly connected to the main plot that not many can successfully do nowadays and actually make it look good.

As an audience member, I was more connected to the actual story of the subplot rather than the main plotline. Now, if we are talking about special effects…. Then oh boy did that main storyline have some great effects. You tell me that seeing the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and the entire character cast of Halo in the same scene isn’t absolutely iconic.

All in all, Ready Player One is simply a movie to enjoy. To see hundreds of fan-favorite characters from movies, video games, and TV shows all over the course of two hours might be a dream to someone, but trashy to another. This movie packed the references, but did it well. With special effects and the beautiful set, it becomes almost easy to look past the acting and the storyline.


My Rating: 84%

Acting: 2.9/4

Cinematography: 3.6/4

Story: 3.1/4

Enjoyability: 3.9/4

‘Bridge to Terabithia’: How One Death Changed Disney

For our first Time Warp Tuesday, where we cover older movies that have changed the film industry, we review ‘Bridge to Terabithia’.

By Anthony Peyton, Edited by Olivia Norwood

In February of 2007, Walt Disney Pictures released ‘Bridge to Terabithia’. This was quite different from most of the children’s movies that Disney had made at the time. It was, in fact, their first live action film where a lead character under the age of 18 dies.

In this one, 13 year old Leslie (AnnaSophia Robb) attempts to swing on a rope over a stream, falls, hits her head, and dies on impact. This only occurs in the story after persuading the audience to form a bond with Leslie, as she has an imagination one only wishes they could obtain. He further influences us to adore her as she gradually brings the main character, Jess (Josh Hutcherson), out of what seemed like a never ending but still growing depression.

This was all intentional from the mind of both director Gábor Csupó (‘The Rugrats’, ‘The Simpsons’) and Katherine Paterson (author of the book preceding the film) as they wanted to show – in a tragic way – how to open your mind to seeing the loss of Leslie as something much more.

Disney is no stranger to developing deaths that would later have meaning. There was ‘Bambi’, ‘The Brave Little Toaster’, and ‘The Lion King’.

Too soon Mufasa, too soon.

‘Bridge to Terabithia’ showed a side to Disney that it had never really touched. It was sensitive and they didn’t know how a child’s death would be received among critics. Fortunately for them, it did wonderful with a certified fresh on Rotten Tomatoes and a score of 85%. As Jennie Punter of Globe and Mail stated, “It’s the sort of movie I admire more in retrospect than I did while watching it.”

Punter had a very valid point that not everyone sees. A friend of mine, after watching the film for the first time just a week ago, said as the credits begun rolling, “I didn’t like it. It was just sad. It was happy the entire way and then they killed her, which there was no reason for them to do.” I understood at first, but it was easy to recognize why the author wrote her death in the first place and why the director stuck true to it.

Death is always seen as a tragic event and that, of course, is true. In film, however, death can be a symbol of something much bigger. ‘Bridge to Terabithia’ successfully opened the imagination of children and teaching them to use it to help mourn after a loss. That isn’t a tragedy, that is called a victory.