Film Forecast Friday: September 14

No podcast this week for the Film Forecast, but we do got a post for ya! September 14, 2018 has some very interesting movies coming out.

We have…

  1. A Simple Favor
  2. The Predator
  3. Unbroken: Path to Redemption
  4. White Boy Rick
  5. Lizzie

Anthony’s Opinion:

I think this week has some good movies that have been talked about pretty often lately. Specifically The Predator and A Simple Favor. The Predator is a highly anticipated remake/sequel (?) to the classic franchise. Chances are, it’ll make the most at the box office this weekend. This doesn’t mean it’s going to be the best movie, but it will probably make the most money.

A Simple Favor is a movie I’ve been looking forward to for ages now. It’s starring Anna Kendrick and Blake Lively as two very different woman, but it has a very intriguing plotline I’m excited to see pan out. It’ll make the second most at box this week, behind The Predator.

The next three movies (Unbroken: Path to Redemption, White Boy Rick, and Lizzie) won’t make big – if any – impressions at box his weekend. However, I will say I’m incredibly excited for White Boy Rick, as it looks like it has potential to be a good movie. Lizzie is starring Chloe Sevigny and Kristen Stewart and tells yet another story of the infamous Lizzie Borden.

Olivia’s Opinion:

Listen. The Predator looks like crap. Will it stop people from seeing it? Unfortunately, no. I want it to tank but it won’t so that is the reality that we (mostly me) are living through.

The new Blake Lively film A Simple Favor is one film that I am excited to see. With costars such as Anna Kendrick and Henry Golding, I expect a huge turnout for this sexy mystery and I expect to see Henry Golding shirtless again. So, that’s a big thumbs up from me.

As for the lesbian drama that no one expected Lizzie, I think this might garner a lot of attention from the indie following. It stars Chloe Sevigny and Kristen Stewart and maybe their acting will finally be seen as serious with this new thriller after their past few unnoticed films.

As for Matthew McConaughey’s White Boy Rick (which reminds me a lot of Johnny Depp’s Blow), I think this will be a box office hit. Not necessarily as big as other films like A Simple Favor or The Predator. More on the box office status of other 2018 films like BlacKkKlansman or Eighth Grade. 

Overall, The Predator is taking home big money this weekend. Big money from a big YIKES movie. Let’s go shirtless Henry Golding for A Simple Favor!

Advertisements

Basement Talk 005: The Magical Impact of Harry Potter

For the 5th episode of Basement Talk, hosts Anthony and Olivia (and guest Julia) fangirl over Harry Potter, their favorite characters, books/movies, and the impact it had on an entire generation.

Episode Length: 37 minutes

Intro & Outro Song: “funhouse” by John Treash

Hit Me!: 15 Years of ‘Thirteen’ and It’s Defiant Youth

By Olivia Norwood, Edited by Anthony Peyton

It’s been 15 years since we were introduced to the gritty and hardcore coming of age film, Thirteen, and it hasn’t aged a bit.

Although the 2003 story gives off a very early 2000’s vibes with the clothing and music, teenagers Tracy (Evan Rachel Wood) and Evie (Nikki Reed) still mirror the youth of today. Tracy, the straight A student, befriends the rebellious Evie in hopes of becoming popular. With this friendship comes the destruction of Tracy’s image, morals, and family as she begins to steal, use drugs, and act violent.

What makes this relevant to adolescence today is that it’s real. Written by a 13 year old Nikki Reed, Thirteen was based on her own drug addicted, promiscuous life, which provides massive insight into an actual teenager’s experiences.

Teen addiction is and was a massive problem and the effects are obviously damaging but this film shows the downward spiral of it all. Tracy went from being a friendly, hardworking student and daughter to a raging, mentally unstable teen. She self harms through cutting and having her friend beat her up. Tracy’s fast life with esometimes older boys ruins her relationships with everyone around including Evie.

Near the end of the film, we see her secrets revealed to her mother in a betrayal from Evie and a mental breakdown from Tracy. She’s darker and more disturbed. Inside she’s broken and her outrageous actions are a cry for help even when her behavior gives off a different story.

Reed knew exactly what we wanted to see in a coming of age film which was the other side of the teenage experience. One that is raw, chaotic and goes unnoticed or ignored by society. There’s a dark side to everything and Thirteen exposes it while showing the real humanity behind it.

Chloë Grace Moretz Shines in ‘The Miseducation of Cameron Post’

By Olivia Norwood, Edited by Anthony Peyton

Earlier this year, we were introduced to the worst performance in Chloë Grace Moretz’ career with Brain on Fire. As a fan of Moretz’ work, I was thoroughly disappointed to see the Netflix Original and hoped for another film/performance this year that would make up for it.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post was that film and Moretz’ lead role was that performance. Taking place in 1993, teenaged Cameron is sent to a Christian treatment center after she is caught making out with a girl in the backseat of a car. While struggling with her oppressive situation, Cameron manages to find a few good friends in Native American Adam (Forrest Goodluck) and hippie Jane Fonda (Sasha Lane).

What I love so much about Moretz’ performance is that it’s completely different from the past where she played the headstrong, outspoken girl. Her role as Cameron is definitely the opposite as she is quiet, shy, and submissive. It’s refreshing to see Moretz as something that is more vulnerable and deeper than just the face value that we get with a lot of her characters.

Along with Moretz, the supporting characters gave their own memorable performances. Owen Campbell, who plays Mark, seemed like he was just another character but proved us wrong with one of the most powerful scenes I’ve seen this year that includes a dramatic and emotional reading of a bible verse that results in a mental breakdown. It’s one of the best performances of the film and Campbell deserves many praise for it.

All in all, The Miseducation of Cameron Post was one of the most authentic films of the year with actors who treat the material and the characters with respect.


My Rating: 95%

Acting: 3.8/4

Cinematography: 3.8/4

Story: 3.9/4

Enjoyability: 3.7/4

‘The Room’: The Best Worst Movie Ever

By Julia Wilson, Edited by Therese Gardner

The Room is infamous for many reasons. Its strange origins, how absolutely terrible it is, and the cult following it has developed.

The man, the myth, the legend, Tommy Wiseau, wrote, directed, and starred in this film. Even those closest to him are unsure how he got the money to make this film which cost roughly $6 million to make which, if you’ve seen it, is quite hard to believe.

But Wiseau’s money isn’t the only thing that’s mysterious about him. For the longest time no one knew exactly how old he was, but after a quick internet search it seems we may have finally settled on 63. People also aren’t sure exactly where he’s from as he used to claim he was from New Orleans, but his accent told a different story.

The mystique surrounding Wiseau and The Room was a large contributor to its cult following. However, that isn’t the only factor. It also helps that it’s so bad that it makes you actually want to watch it. While most bad movies make you want to turn them off, The Room somehow has you coming back for more.

Although not very popular at the time of its release in 2003, it has now grown to cult status with regular midnight showings across the country that Wiseau himself will often show up to and sign stuff for fans.

The intrigue surrounding this film even sparked a movie, The Disaster Artist, which stars James Franco and is based off the book by Greg Sestero who co-starred in The Room. The Disaster Artist gives a detailed look into how this strange film came to be.

All in all, The Room definitely made an impression on the film community. It’s hard to pinpoint what about it makes it so watchable despite how bad it is, but to be so widely talked about 15 years after its release is quite impressive for any movie. Especially for one known as the worst movie ever made.

 

Basement Talk 003: What’s Going on With Netflix?

For episode 3 of Basement Talk, hosts Olivia Norwood and Anthony Peyton welcome BFS writer Julia Wilson to join them in a deep discussion about Netflix as a whole. They also evaluate the 2018 Netflix films thus far.

Episode Length: 41 minutes

Intro & Outro Song: “funhouse” by John Treash

Falling Crazy in Love with ‘Crazy Rich Asians’

By Olivia Norwood, Edited by Julia Wilson

One of my favorite film genres (if not, my favorite) is romantic comedy. From The Wedding Planner to Love, Simon, I always rush to the theatre (or Netflix) to see these movies. More recently, I rushed to see Crazy Rich Asians which did not disappoint.

Starring an all Asian cast, Crazy Rich Asians follows Chinese-American Rachel Chu (Constance Wu) on a trip to Singapore where she meets her boyfriend Nick Young’s (Henry Golding) family and discovers just how wealthy, luxurious, and privileged they are. Rachel, then, tries to prove her worth to his snobbish, overbearing mother Eleanor (Michelle Yeoh) and ponders if she’s really cut out to be apart of Nick’s otherworldly life.

This film exceeded everyone’s expectations as it made $34 million dollars at the box office in its first five days, making it the best debut for a comedy this year and the best debut for a rom-com. This shouldn’t be shocking because it marks a very important moment in film history as it is the first Hollywood film to feature an all Asian cast in 25 years. When I went to see the film, nearly the entire audience were of Asian descent and that is something to be immensely proud of.

Crazy Rich Asians is pulling in the audiences that may have felt underrepresented in Hollywood and giving them something to connect to, and that is why this film made the money that it did.

Aside from its logistics, let’s talk about the film itself. I loved it, to say the least. It was one of the most visually appealing films that I have seen this year (and the past few years) and had characters that you just want to hold and never let go.

What I mean by that is that I want a second movie.

By the end of the film, I was begging for more of the posh Astrid (Gemma Chan), the fashionable Oliver (Nico Santos), and the goofy Peik Lin (Awkwafina). I wanted to follow the rest of Rachel and Nick’s relationship, see what the wedding was like, and see if she ever meets her long lost father. Now, the film is based on the book trilogy by Kevin Kwan and with the extra clip added at the end of the film (NO SPOILERS) I think it’s safe to hope for a sequel.

In conclusion, Crazy Rich Asians made me laugh, cry, and fall in love with its main AND supporting characters. It’s a beautiful film that deserves all of the spotlight and praise that it’s receiving.


My Rating: 91%

Acting: 3/4

Cinematography: 3.8/4

Story: 3.9/4

Enjoyability: 4/4