‘Taco Shop’: Slapstick Comedy Gone Wrong

By Therese Gardner, Edited by Olivia Norwood

Despite the other wonderfully done comedies this year including Blockers and Game Night, the new Taco Shop is not all that it’s intended to be. While it is categorized as a slapstick comedy characteristic of broad humor, this film lacks any presence of it. As someone who loves a good laugh, I enjoy films with no social purpose except to make people laugh and feel good. This is definitely not one of those films. As a whole, this movie lacks any sense of direction and its message is vague.

Taco Shop follows Smokes (Tyler Posey), as he plans to resign from his job at Taco Dollar to open up his own taco shop. His plans get interrupted when he discovers his mother has recently lost her job and is now struggling with debt and the possibility of losing their house. As a result of their current financial situation, Smokes is forced to stay at Taco Dollar. The pressure continues to mount when a taco truck decides to park across the street from Taco Dollar causing a war to ensue, as both wish for success.

Can Smokes cooperate with his coworkers in order to save Taco Dollar? Well, obviously, the answer is yes since it’s a predictable film with no motivating meaning. By the end of the film, Smokes has saved Taco Dollar from being taken over by their competition.

One thing I disliked the most about this film was its cringeworthy nature and poor application of crude, sarcastic humor. This was only one of few projects for Director Joaquin Perea and it was not a memorable one. If you couldn’t already tell, I was not impressed even in the slightest. It wasn’t even stupid funny – just foolish.

I don’t want to be completely harsh, however, there were not many strengths, if any, within this film. Considering it is a remake of Taco Shop (2012), I’m not really sure what Perea intended to achieve. If there is anything to be learned from this film, it’s that not every film should be remade and not every director is capable of writing worthy comedy.


My Rating: 39.4%

Acting: 1.5/4

Cinematography: 2/4

Story: 1.8/4

Enjoyability: 1/4

Advertisements

‘Titanic’ Makes My Heart Go On

By Anthony Peyton, Edited by Olivia Norwood

When I think of late 90s cinema, there are dozens of movies that come to mind. We have American Beauty (1999), The Sixth Sense (1999), Good Will Hunting (1997), Clueless (1995), and so many others that quickly became classics. For me, however, none touched me quite as much as Titanic (1997).

Titanic is a movie that nearly everyone knows about as most grew up having seen it once or twice. Maybe they’ve even heard about its impressive eleven academy award wins at the 1998 Oscars. No matter how one may have heard of it, it’s a movie that’s touched the hearts and minds of everybody.

Given that everybody knows what the film is about, I’ll keep the summary brief. When poor Jack Dawson (Leonardo DiCaprio) and recently engaged Rose Bukater (Kate Winslet) meet aboard the RMS Titanic, they find love in one another. They build a relationship beyond anything many have seen, but realize sometimes love doesn’t last as long as you may like it to. In their case, however, it wasn’t a break-up that brought this realization.

The sinking of the RMS Titanic was the climax of this movie, and showed – practically in real time – the sinking of the ship and the drowning of the lives on board. Director James Cameron knew how to capture this emotional tragedy and make it so the audience doesn’t even care about its running time (194 minutes).

Titanic 1
Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Everything about this movie was astonishing to me and millions would agree. Being able to witness such stellar performances by DiCaprio and Winslet (as well as such notable names as Kathy Bates, Billy Zane, and Frances Fisher) under equally beautiful writing makes any moviegoer fill with joyful tears from beginning to end.

It doesn’t happen often in modern cinema that you see a cast of actors and actresses who are all so individually dedicated to their roles. It was obvious that each wanted to portray their characters with the seriousness that those on the real Titanic would’ve maintained.

Much of this is due to the main man himself, James Cameron (Avatar, Aliens). People are no stranger to the work of Cameron, as he had already released Aliens in 1986, eleven years prior to Titanic.

Not everyone was too confident in him for Titanic (given that the budget was incredibly high – the highest of any movie in history at the time – and that most thought it would be “just another romance flick”), and many lost faith before it had even been released. That concept in itself is a marvel to me given its brilliant reception and continued adoration today.

It’s not doing Titanic justice by calling it a brilliant historical adaptation, when it felt like so much more. It was a near spiritual awakening for most who watched it, whether you’ve seen it once, twice, or two dozen times.


My Rating: 96%

Acting: 3.8/4

Cinematography: 3.9/4

Story: 3.8/4

Enjoyability: 3.9/4

‘The Endless’ Journey of Trying to Understand This Movie

By Anthony Peyton, Edited by Olivia Norwood

I really didn’t think I’d run into more of a mind twisting movie than Annihilation so soon into the year, but I was truly proven wrong with Snowfort Pictures’ The Endless.

In the most simple explanation, it’s about two brothers who escaped a UFO Death Cult when they were younger. Now that they are cleaners and living an unsatisfied life, one brother, Aaron (Aaron Moorhead) wants a change.

He decides that he wasn’t happy with the lack of closure from the cult and wants to go back. Other brother Justin (Justin Benson) is very reluctant, but for some reason gives in.

As the movie progresses, it gets ridiculously strange and confusing. The audience is left questioning whether or not this strange group of people is actually a cult or not. All we really know is that it’s an otherworldly situation with people who know that life does not stop at just them.

Some of the cult crew included leader Hal (Tate Ellington), Anna (Callie Hernandez), and Tim (Lew Temple). They all presented strange and unique personalities, but they all added something to the development of the plot – even if it wasn’t very much.

Although this movie is about aliens, don’t expect to see any… because you won’t. The aliens are always seen in the darkness or underwater, but what can you expect? It’s yet another question that leaves you frustrated. Were they even aliens?

Regardless, I do have to applaud Justin Benson for not only starring as one of the brothers, but also co-directing (alongside Aaron Moorhead, the other brother), creating the story, and writing the story. Not many people in the industry can do that nowadays.

The acting wasn’t spectacular from anyone, to be honest. At the same time, I don’t think that was the point. The point was to deliver an interesting story that unintentionally ended up more confusing and mind twisting than “interesting”.
The Endless was a very forgettable movie. It was good, but forgettable. But, before I forget it altogether, I’ll say good job to the cast and crew for developing a movie about a cult that isn’t actually about the cult itself but actually about the cult that came after the cult and a force field and… okay, I’m done.


My Rating: 79%

Acting: 2.9/4

Cinematography: 3.2/4

Story: 3.3/4

Enjoyability: 3.2/4